Friday, May 11, 2012

Collared elephant provide hope in finding vital corridors in fragmented habitat

A female Borneo pygmy elephant recently fitted with a satellite collar is expected to become her herd’s ambassador in determining important migration corridors between forested areas currently cut off by development, including the Sandakan-Lahad Datu road.

The collar on the 1.9-metre tall elephant captured in the Segaliud Lokan Forest Reserve is expected to transmit data on possible further migration into the Pin Supu Forest Reserve, or from the Lower Kinabatangan region to Segaliud Lokan.

Borneo Conservation Trust (BCT) Conservation and Research head Raymond Alfred said the estimated 290 to 310 elephants in the Kinabatangan region are currently separated from the main population in central Sabah, including the Segaliud Lokan Forest Reserve, by a main road.

Alfred said the solution to habitat fragmentation lies in the creation of a network of wildlife “corridors” that link forest reserves.

“This collaring activity is one of the components of the Mega Biodiversity Corridor programme initiated by BCT, which aims to enhance forest ecosystem connectivity and ecological corridors within key habitats of the Bornean elephant and Orang Utan in Sabah.

“The Mega Biodiversity Corridor will allow elephants and Orang Utan to safely migrate, access food sources and establish crucial genetic links between populations,” Alfred said in a joint statement issued by BCT and the Sabah Wildlife Department here today.

The elephant named “Segaliud” is estimated to be between 25 and 35 years old. She was observed to be physically healthy and was in lactation with a calf of around five to six months old.

The collaring exercise is the first to be carried out by BCT and the Sabah Wildlife Department’s Wildlife Rescue Unit in collaboration with KTS Plantation Sdn Bhd.

Alfred said there was a need to develop a long-term action plan to address the issue of fragmentation.

“Steps may include land purchase and the securing and restoration of riparian reserves (at river banks) to re-establish the vital wildlife corridors that link key habitats and protected areas,” Alfred said.

Sabah Wildlife Department director Dr Laurentius Ambu said the department is working closely with BCT and its partners from the private sector to reinstate and maintain crucial elephant corridors.

“Wildlife corridors offer one of the best long term solutions facing the endangered Bornean elephant,” Ambu said.
According to the Elephant Action Plan recently released by the department, there are an estimated 2,040 elephants in Sabah.



8 comments:

YB said...

A female Borneo pygmy elephant recently fitted with a satellite collar is expected to become her herd’s ambassador in determining important migration corridors between forested areas currently cut off by development, including the Sandakan-Lahad Datu road.

This can help us identify the migration corridors in the forestry areas so that we know where they go.

YB said...

The Pygmy Elephants are one of the endangered species which needs to be protected from harm and extinctions. These studies will enable us to understand them better.

Green Sabah said...

That's rights, after identifying their migration pattern, this will help us better understand them and allow us to protect them better.

Green Sabah said...

The Pygmy Elephants are considered endangered and about 2,000 remain in Sabah. The Borneo Elephant Wildlife Sanctuary in Kinabatangan will begin operation by the middle of this year.
Sabah Wildlife Director, Dr. Laurentius Ambu, said 2,000 hectares of land have been allocated to provide shelter and rehabilitate rescued Borneo pygmy elephants.

http://sabah-go-green.blogspot.com/2012/01/borneo-elephant-wildlife-sanctuary.html

Moktar said...

The collaring exercise is the first to be carried out by BCT and the Sabah Wildlife Department’s Wildlife Rescue Unit in collaboration with KTS Plantation Sdn Bhd. Hopefully this effort will pay off.

Alimah said...

Gajah borneo perlu dijaga kerana ia adalah binatang yang hanya ada di Borneo.

Jeff Ambuyat said...

baik Jabatan Hidupan Liar Sabah dan juga NGO bekerjasama dengan Felda plantation untuk mengeluarkan beberapa kawanan gajah liar yang terperangkap di kawasan tanah rancangan Felda.. sudah banyak kes dimana gajah2 liar ini merosakkan tanaman sawit dan mengganggu pekerja2 ladang terutamanya di Felda Lahad Datu..

Jeff Ambuyat said...

untuk menyelamatkan haiwan liar yang semakin terancam ini, perkara pertama yang perlu dilakukan ialah, berusaha mengelakkan pertembungan antara haiwan ini dengan manusia..

Post a Comment